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There is no doubt that being a teacher is a tough job. Having more tools to help you understand yourself as a teacher is always helpful and the enneagram for teachers is one such tool!

Between your personality and the personalities of all of your students, there is a lot going on and a lot of potential for trouble spots.

Thankfully, the enneagram is a wonderful tool to help you understand yourself better so that you can educate your students better.

The Enneagram for Teachers

What Enneagram Type Teacher Am I?

Not sure what type you are yet? That’s ok! I recommend heading over to my post on how to find your enneagram type and starting there.

What Enneagram Type Is My Student?

I’ll say this right now… this post is not going to help you find your student’s enneagram type. I’m right there with you. I want to know the enneagram type of all my kids too.

However as an enneagram coach, I’m also aware of how incredibly easy it is to mistype kids (I’m guilty of it with one of my own children already). It can also be detrimental to tell your student their type as it may mislead them and we don’t want that!

So save the typing of students till they are older and they can find their type themselves and instead focus on one area where you can succeed… yourself!

(If you have adult students then you still can’t actually type them yourself, but you definitely could see if they were open to discussing the enneagram and finding their type)

I’m going to be covering A LOT of material in this enneagram for teachers post so be prepared!

We’ll be covering:

  • Your classroom style
  • Teacher strengths
  • Stress triggers based on your enneagram type
  • What to watch out for while teaching

Which Enneagram Type Is The Best Teacher?

There is no “best” enneagram type for teachers. Each enneagram type has unique qualities and traits that can make them excellent teachers. Each type of teacher is needed and should be appreciated.

What Type of Teacher Are You

The Enneagram For Teachers

type 1 teacher

Type 1 Teachers

Type 1 Classroom Style

An enneagram 1 teacher’s classroom is likely to be an organized classroom that has consistent rules and encourages hard work and fairness.

Strengths of Type 1 Teachers

Some of the ways you excel as a type 1 teacher is that you are reliable, ethical, have clear expectations, you consistency stay on schedule, and you likely always have your lesson plans in order.

Stress Triggers for Type 1 Teachers

These things would trigger any type 1 but type 1 teachers are likely to have even more difficulty with these as kids can increase the occurrence.

Stress triggers for type 1 teachers include: messes or lack of organization, dishonesty, criticism of you or your students, noticing too many problems/errors, and lack of follow through.

What To Watch Out For As A Type 1 Teacher

As a type 1 teacher, you’ll want to work on not being too hard on yourself, overworking yourself or your students, forgetting to include fun in learning, and perfectionism.

type 2 teachers

Type 2 Teachers

Type 2 Classroom Style

An enneagram 2 teacher’s classroom is likely to be a nurturing and caring classroom with emphasis on connections and generosity.

Strengths of Type 2 Teachers

Some of the ways you excel as a type 2 teacher is that you are a strong community builder, thoughtful, you likely compliment your students often. You are supportive and you check in with your fellow teachers to see how they are doing or if they need anything.

Stress Triggers for Type 2 Teachers

These things would trigger any type 2 but type 2 teachers are likely to have even more difficulty with these as kids can increase the occurrence.

Stress triggers for type 2 teachers include: overextending yourself, feeling unappreciated, having your shortcomings pointed out, and when your students do not want your help.

What To Watch Out For As A Type 2 Teacher

As a type 2 teacher, you’ll want to work on not burning out (don’t forget self-care!), your tendency to not say “no” when saying no is needed. Watch out for when you feel unappreciated simply because it’s not being shown the way you expect it, and be careful of when you are rescuing instead of just supporting.

enneagram 3 teacher

Type 3 Teachers

Type 3 Classroom Style

An enneagram 3 teacher’s classroom is likely to be a classroom with clear expectations and one that encourages success and growth.

Strengths of Type 3 Teachers

Some of the ways you excel as a type 3 teacher is that you encourage a can-do attitude, you are efficient, energetic, unafraid to try new methods, and you help your students achieve their goals.

Stress Triggers for Type 3 Teachers

These things would trigger any type 3 but type 3 teachers are likely to have even more difficulty with these as kids can increase the occurrence.

Stress triggers for type 3 teachers include: having your failures pointed out, when your students don’t put in the effort, having to slow down, and not being acknowledged.

What To Watch Out For As A Type 3 Teacher

As a type 3 teacher, you’ll want to work on your tendency to try to solve instead of just listening. Watch out for burnout (find that work/life balance), be careful of focusing on the future and what is next that you aren’t staying in the present, and watch out for over-scheduling.

enneagram 4 teacher

Type 4 Teachers

Type 4 Classroom Style

An enneagram 4 teacher’s classroom is likely to be a creative and authentic classroom with emphasis on self-expression and depth.

Strengths of Type 4 Teachers

Some of the ways you excel as a type 4 teacher is that you are reflective and self-evaluating, passionate, intuitive, you are responsive to your students’ feelings, and you encourage your students to be themselves.

Stress Triggers for Type 4 Teachers

These things would trigger any type 4 but type 4 teachers are likely to have even more difficulty with these as kids can increase the occurrence.

Stress triggers for type 4 teachers include: misunderstandings, having to conform to standards, being rejected, and not being affirmed (particularly of your specific or unique talents).

What To Watch Out For As A Type 4 Teacher

As a type 4 teacher, you’ll want to work on not avoiding mundane tasks, pushing exploration of feelings on your students (not everyone wants that kind of self-exploration) Watch out for avoiding facts in favor of feelings and focusing too much on what seems to be missing.

enneagram 5 teacher

Type 5 Teachers

Type 5 Classroom Style

An enneagram 5 teacher’s classroom is likely to be a calm classroom with focus on intellectual discussions and fact checking.

Strengths of Type 5 Teachers

Some of the ways you excel as a type 5 teacher is that you are a big-picture thinker, objective, very informed and ready for questions. You thoroughly research topics and classwork and you help your students explore problems logically.

Stress Triggers for Type 5 Teachers

These things would trigger any type 5 but type 5 teachers are likely to have even more difficulty with these as kids can increase the occurrence.

Stress triggers for type 5 teachers include: not getting enough recharge time, too much noise, emotionally charged conversations, and not being able to control situations.

What To Watch Out For As A Type 5 Teacher

As a type 5 teacher, you’ll want to work on not withdrawing or detaching too much, over-thinking things (don’t spend so much time in the research phase that your “doing” gets put off for longer than needed). Watch out for not recharging consistently so that you don’t get drained and be careful to not shut down others’ emotions.

enneagram 6 teachers

Type 6 Teachers

Type 6 Classroom Style

An enneagram 6 teacher’s classroom is likely to be a well-stocked and safe classroom with lots of support and predictability.

Strengths of Type 6 Teachers

Some of the ways you excel as a type 6 teacher is that you create helpful resources for students, you are protective, responsible, and supportive of your students. You are great at troubleshooting curriculum and events.

Stress Triggers for Type 6 Teachers

These things would trigger any type 6 but type 6 teachers are likely to have even more difficulty with these as kids can increase the occurrence.

Stress triggers for type 6 teachers include: sudden change of plans, students being bullied, others questioning your teaching style, and unknown situations.

What To Watch Out For As A Type 6 Teacher

As a type 6 teacher, you’ll want to work on not overindulging in your fears, not trusting your students or co-workers. Watch out for reacting too quickly (don’t forget to understand where others are coming from), and work on not doubting your abilities.

enneagram 7 teachers

Type 7 Teachers

Type 7 Classroom Style

An enneagram 7 teacher’s classroom is likely to be a lively and joyful classroom with lots of positivity and engagement.

Strengths of Type 7 Teachers

Some of the ways you excel as a type 7 teacher is that you build a positive atmosphere, and you are open minded, optimistic, and excited to try new things. You keep your students engaged and excited to learn.

Stress Triggers for Type 7 Teachers

These things would trigger any type 7 but type 7 teachers are likely to have even more difficulty with these as kids can increase the occurrence.

Stress triggers for type 7 teachers include: having to stick to mundane routines, students being negative or sad, wasted opportunities, and not being taken seriously.

What To Watch Out For As A Type 7 Teacher

As a type 7 teacher, you’ll want to work on not reframing situations and being more consistent. Watch out for your tendency to push enthusiasm on kids (especially if they don’t feel the same ways as you or are more reserved), and be careful of presenting or having too many options.

enneagram 8 teachers

Type 8 Teachers

Type 8 Classroom Style

An enneagram 8 teacher’s classroom is likely to be a just and fair classroom that has lots of engagement and passion.

Strengths of Type 8 Teachers

Some of the ways you excel as a type 8 teacher is that you are direct in communication with your students and you challenge them to be independent. You are not afraid of making big decisions, you stand up for what is right, and you are protective of your students.

Stress Triggers for Type 8 Teachers

These things would trigger any type 8 but type 8 teachers are likely to have even more difficulty with these as kids can increase the occurrence.

Stress triggers for type 8 teachers include: lack of autonomy, dishonesty, when your students ignore your guidelines, and if you unintentionally upset your students.

What To Watch Out For As A Type 8 Teacher

As a type 8 teacher, you’ll want to work on your anger (or passion that feels like anger to others). Watch out for arguing just for the sake of control, not listening to others before moving ahead. Be careful with your volume especially with the more reserved students.

enneagram 9 teacher

Type 9 Teachers

Type 9 Classroom Style

An enneagram 9 teacher’s classroom is likely to be a stress-free and accepting classroom with emphasis on harmony and understanding.

Strengths of Type 9 Teachers

Some of the ways you excel as a type 9 teacher is that you collaborate with students and fellow teachers, you are non-judgmental, optimistic despite circumstances, diplomatic, and you are supportive of students and their needs.

Stress Triggers for Type 9 Teachers

These things would trigger any type 9 but type 9 teachers are likely to have even more difficulty with these as kids can increase the occurrence.

Stress triggers for type 9 teachers include: conflict with your students of fellow teachers, pressure to make quick decisions, saying yes when you really wanted to say no, and not being listened to or noticed.

What To Watch Out For As A Type 9 Teacher

As a type 9 teacher, you’ll want to work on not avoiding conflict and believing that everything “will be fine” (don’t forget that effort is usually needed to solve issues). Watch out for having a lack of boundaries and for caving in and saying yes when you should say no.

Check out the links below for more enneagram info!
The Best Enneagram Books
Conflict Styles
Communication Styles